Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
In my new role, I want you to be part of the conversation.
ASK A QUESTION

What stories matter most to you, and which people do you find most interesting? Send me messages, photos, videos and your ideas.

What’s so ”terrible” about a phone working like a free-to-air pocket TV? Well, that’s it in a nutshell. I don’t see the difference, except that it’s turning your phone or tablet computer into a pocket TV. What’s the difference, except that the phone may be able to work like a portable recorder of free-to-air signals, basically taking a VCR or DVD recorder on the road with you?

Submitted by Mike Christensen

What do you think is the future of TV? Tell Katie here.

Katie,

Television used to be free; for years now we can only watch public channels by purchasing the “basic” cable package. I have always resented that but had no choice. Even with antennas the reception is horrible. Is there a way to get free access?

Television was considered a another way of communication like radio. Why are we being forced to purchase cable if we want to view “public” television.

Thank you for a great job you do hitting on important issues.

Submitted by Rikki Martinez

What do you think is the future of TV? Tell Katie here

Asserting that the future of broadcast television is seriously at risk, networks, stations, and programming companies have asked the Supreme Court to give them broad copyright protection against the streaming of their programs on the Internet by an outsider, with no payments to them.  The Court may take its first look later this year at the case, American Broadcasting Companies v. Aereo, Inc. (docket 13-461).  An answering brief is now due on November 12.   The case, if granted, could be decided in the current Term. (via SCOTUS Blog)

Asserting that the future of broadcast television is seriously at risk, networks, stations, and programming companies have asked the Supreme Court to give them broad copyright protection against the streaming of their programs on the Internet by an outsider, with no payments to them.  The Court may take its first look later this year at the case, American Broadcasting Companies v. Aereo, Inc. (docket 13-461).  An answering brief is now due on November 12.   The case, if granted, could be decided in the current Term. (via SCOTUS Blog)